Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Babies Part 2

After lambing kicked off Tuesday with a kitchen lamb, I was thrilled to look down through the woods on Friday and see a lovely Tunis cross ewe nursing a little red lamb.  The lamb was up, partially cleaned off and had a full belly. That made me happy!
I did want to move the two of them up to the stable as I like to keep a ewe and lamb locked up safely for a few days as they bond and mama gets her own food, water, peace and quiet.

Because of which pasture this sheep lives in, I had to move another pasture-full of sheep, move two dogs and open a fair number of gates before I could get her and her lamb into the stable.  The entire trip out of the woods was a long one as I did it holding the lamb at mama's nose level while slowly walking up the hill and hoping she would follow.  She would bawl, the lamb would answer and she would come a few more steps.  Then she would change her mind and trot back down the hill acting as if she was searching for her lamb.  I had to turn around, carry the lamb down the hill and start again.  I was quite relieved when I finally was able to shut them in a stall and go for fresh hay and water.

Saturday afternoon I noticed that Regina, our oldest Anatolian Shepherd, was half way down the pasture with a sheep.  I knew something was up.
It was a lovely day so we left the ewe to spend a little extra time with her ewe lamb.  One of the Dexters was quite interested in the process.

So by the end of Saturday we had a little ram lamb in the kitchen and two ewe lambs on mamas in the stable.  Little did we know that Sunday would get rather interesting.  And I will address that tomorrow.

4 comments:

  1. Beautiful pictures of your sheep. You are a very good story teller I really enjoyed reading the story of moving your ewe and her lamb.

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    1. Thank you, Amy! We love all of our creatures here ;-)

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  2. I'm afraid that I'm glad I don't have lambing to deal with just now. It's enough just dragging the pasture and fertilizing and feeling guilty that my horses aren't getting the training sessions they should be having. Still, I am aware of the loss in my life, not having tiny lambs around. It's got to be charming - when it's not all work and worry. I enjoyed the story -

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    1. It is a lot of work & in the thick of it it seems a day never ends but before we know it the lambs are grown, it is fall & it all seems so far away ;-) Glad you enjoyed the story!

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